Traditional

Traditional Plasters

Sympathetic with Older Walls

Before World War II it was very difficult to reach the temperatures to economically fire the plaster of what is commonly seen today. All lath and pre war walls I have seen in the home have been formed using Lime. Natural Hydraulic Lime (not to be confused with Hydrated Lime) comes in three strengths for interior and exterior walls. Easy to mix, difficult to apply and slighty more expensive than Modern Plaster. NHL has several properties which are sympathetic to pre war houses.

Damp Issues & “Breathing”

It is not uncommon to see damp issues arise in tradition walls that are originally composed of Natural Hydraulic Lime under the surface of Modern Plaster. Apart from Artex, Modern Plasters do not allow water or oxygen to flow through. Lime Plaster is water permeable and thus allows damp areas to chemically move out of the wall. It’s rather long and interesting science, and makes an interesting read. However, understanding how water flows, heats up and evapourates is important for homes that are in areas exposed to so much water in our damp climate as our own. Natural Stones pointed with Portland Cement, often show signs of errosion because the water cannot flow through the pointing. It continues to linger in the stone and errodes faster. The same can be true for larger walls in bedrooms, around windows replaced with modern plasters. Generally the further away from the rain the safer it is to plaster with modern plasters over traditional plasters.

The solution

The solution is obviously to remove modern plaster that is causing the failure of moisture to move freely, and to do this would be to use NHL to plaster indoors or alternatively render outside. A 25kg bag of NHL 3 costs around £25 and washed plastering sand costs very little. The cost of a Lime Finish is more expensive and has to be transported from the mainland is pre slaked tubs. A 10kg tub including postage costs around £20
© This site was packaged and coded by Xara, designed using Xara Web Designer by Alexander Wilson.
Decorator & Plasterer

Traditional

Plasters

Sympathetic with

Older Walls

Before World War II it was very difficult to reach the temperatures to economically fire the plaster of what is commonly seen today. All lath and pre war walls I have seen in the home have been formed using Lime. Natural Hydraulic Lime (not to be confused with Hydrated Lime) comes in three strengths for interior and exterior walls. Easy to mix, difficult to apply and slighty more expensive than Modern Plaster. NHL has several properties which are sympathetic to pre war houses.

Damp Issues &

“Breathing”

It is not uncommon to see damp issues arise in tradition walls that are originally composed of Natural Hydraulic Lime under the surface of Modern Plaster. Apart from Artex, Modern Plasters do not allow water or oxygen to flow through. Lime Plaster is water permeable and thus allows damp areas to chemically move out of the wall. It’s rather long and interesting science, and makes an interesting read. However, understanding how water flows, heats up and evapourates is important for homes that are in areas exposed to so much water in our damp climate as our own. Natural Stones pointed with Portland Cement, often show signs of errosion because the water cannot flow through the pointing. It continues to linger in the stone and errodes faster. The same can be true for larger walls in bedrooms, around windows replaced with modern plasters. Generally the further away from the rain the safer it is to plaster with modern plasters over traditional plasters.

The solution

The solution is obviously to remove modern plaster that is causing the failure of moisture to move freely, and to do this would be to use NHL to plaster indoors or alternatively render outside. A 25kg bag of NHL 3 costs around £25 and washed plastering sand costs very little. The cost of a Lime Finish is more expensive and has to be transported from the mainland is pre slaked tubs. A 10kg tub including postage costs around £20
© This site was packaged and coded by Xara, designed using Xara Web Designer by Alexander Wilson.